Issue Networks

  • Afterschool Policy Advisors Network (APAN)

    Formed in 2006, the Afterschool Policy Advisors Network (APAN) is a national peer learning network of municipal leaders working to create or expand citywide systems of high-quality afterschool opportunities for children and youth. This network helps local elected officials and senior municipal staff promote afterschool opportunities in their cities and nationally by sharing research, tools and best practices. The network is made possible by the generous support of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and The Wallace Foundation.

  • California Cities Gang Prevention Network (CCGPN)

    Formed in 2007, the California Cities Gang Prevention Network, the first of its kind in the nation, focuses on successful anti-gang policies and practices that interweave prevention, intervention, enforcement and a community's "moral voice" as an alternative to prison-only solutions. NLC and the Oakland-based National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) sponsor the network of 13 major cities, with support from the California Endowment and California Wellness Foundation. This network is only open to members of the 13 project city teams.

  • Early Care and Education City Network

    Formed in May 2001, the Early Care and Education (ECE) City Network provides the training, tools, and supports that local officials need to improve outcomes for young children ages 0-5. Through bimonthly newsletters, this network provides municipal leaders with information on improving child development, child care, early learning programs, and early care and education systems. Specific areas of focus include reaching children in family, friend, and neighbor care (FFN) settings, promoting early literacy, and supporting school readiness. The network is made possible by the generous support of the Annie E. Casey Foundation

  • Early Childhood Learning Community

    Formed in June 2003, the Early Learning Community reaches a smaller group of city officials who regularly share ideas and explore topics of interest related to early childhood. This interactive learning community interacts via quarterly conference calls. Key areas of focus include: developing a strong early care and education infrastructure; early childhood policy at the federal and state level; and innovative models of program development and service delivery. The network is made possible by the generous support of the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Contact Tonja Rucker at (202) 626-3004 or rucker@nlc.org if you are interested in joining.

  • Family Economic Success Network

    Formed in 2001, the Family Economic Success (FES) Network provides the training, tools, and supports that local officials need to improve the financial stability of their residents. Specific areas of focus include increasing access to mainstream financial services, helping families build and protect assets, and conducting multi-benefit outreach. The network is made possible by the generous support of the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

  • Education Policy Advisors Network (EPAN)

    Formed in May 2003, the Mayors' Education Policy Advisors Network (EPAN) is a national network that facilitates communication among senior municipal staff who are working with mayors on key issues related to education reform and school improvement. The network is made possible by the generous support of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. EPAN is only open to senior mayoral advisors from the 75 largest cities.

  • Municipal Network for Combating Obesity

    Formed in 2007, the Municipal Network for Combating Obesity (MNCO) provides tools and resources to help local officials combat childhood obesity in their communities. The network assists municipal leaders in adopting and implementing policies to promote active living, healthy eating and access to healthy, affordable foods, and is made possible by the support of Leadership for Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

  • Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth (MNDY)

    Formed in 2002, the Municipal Network on Disconnected Youth (MNDY) is a nationwide peer learning community of municipal leaders who are concerned about older (16-24) young people who are out of work, out of school, and lack strong connections to the community and caring adults. MNDY is a resource that municipal officials may use to create and continuously improve partnerships, policies, and programs that re-engage older youth with education, employment, and their communities. The network is made possible by the generous support of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation

  • Poverty Reduction Peer Network

    The Poverty Reduction Peer Network (PRPN) was formed in 2008 in conjunction with NLC's Poverty Reduction Initiative and the City of Savannah, Ga., Step Up Poverty Reduction Initiative. It is a nationwide peer learning community that brings municipal leaders from 25-30 cities together to learn from each other and address challenges related to poverty. The network is made possible by the generous support of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

  • Youth Participation Advisors Network (YPAN)

    The Youth Participation Advisors Network (YPAN) helps local officials promote youth participation in local government by sharing research, strategies, policies, and best practices. YPAN members can learn about a broad range of topics, including youth councils, youth summits and political forums, youth service and service learning, youth mapping projects, youth master planning, youth-adult partnerships, and appointment of youth to municipal boards and commissions.